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Falafel

Falafel is one of the earliest forms of fast food. Our version is lightly spiced and rolled in a mixture of sesame seeds and oats for a crisp exterior. Serve in pita pockets with lettuce, tomato, onion and a drizzle of tahini or hot sauce, or on top of a green salad for a light summer meal.
Course Appetizers and Snacks
Prep Time 2 hours 10 minutes
Cook Time 5 minutes
Total Time 2 hours 15 minutes
Servings 4 people

Ingredients

For coating:

For falafel:

  • 1 19 oz can chickpeas, drained, rinsed and patted dry (540 ml)
  • 1 cup onion, diced (250 ml)
  • 3 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 1/4 cup cilantro leaves, packed (60 ml)
  • 2 tsp ground cumin (10 ml)
  • 1 tsp salt (5 ml)
  • Freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • 1/2 tsp baking powder (5 ml)
  • 1/4 cup oat flour (60 ml)
  • Oil for frying

Instructions

To make coating:

  1. In a food processor, grind together oats and sesame seeds until the mixture resembles very fine breadcrumbs. Place in a shallow dish.

To make falafel:

  1. Place the chickpeas, onion, garlic, cilantro, cumin, salt and pepper into the bowl of a food processor. Pulse to chop, then process until you have a coarse dough. Transfer mixture to a mixing bowl.
  2. Fold in baking powder and oat flour, adding additional oat flour, if necessary, until mixture can be formed into a ball.
  3. Cover and refrigerate for a couple hours to firm up. *Do not skip this step*
  4. Form the chilled mixture into walnut sized balls, and gently roll in sesame-oat coating.
  5. Heat oil in a deep fryer, or large, heavy-bottomed saucepan, to 375o F.
  6. Fry six to 12 balls at a time until golden brown, flipping once. Watch carefully!
  7. Remove from oil and drain on a paper towel.
  8. Serve warm, tucked into pita bread pockets with shredded lettuce, chopped tomato, sliced onion, and tahini or yogurt sauce, or as an accompaniment to a tossed salad.

Note

  1. To make your own oat flour, process rolled or quick-cooking oats in a food processor until finely ground and powdery. Use more oats than the amount of flour needed, then sift and measure after processing.

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